My Story

My Story

On March 1, 1979, I opened the doors of Angell & Company as a marketing research and consulting company in New York City.

 

Before that, I worked as an Account Executive at a small advertising agency in Boston, then at one of the premier advertising research companies.  And, after that, just before opening Angell & Company, I worked at one of the world's best marketing research companies [namely Monroe Mendelsohn Research].

 

The idea was to provide research and consulting of the highest quality to the very largest companies in the world.

rocketship_200Angell & Company took off like a rocket ship. We became known as a mid-sized firm that could handle very large accounts and very large, difficult projects. 

 

I didn't want to be big.  Had no interest in being a research factory.

 

Wanted quality over quantity.  

 

I hired the best people, paid them very well, and got out of their way.  

 

The company was so successful that I moved out of New York in 1986 [to Connecticut] and really scaled down.  

 

I worked part-time, became a single dad, and kept my hand in with a few clients. 

 

In 1998, I started getting questions about the Internet. I knew nothing about it and called a few clients and asked them to meet me in New York for a meeting on the subject.

 

At that meeting were senior exec's from Citibank, Marriott, The New York Times, and MetLife.  

 

To make a long story short, there were really no resources in those days.  No one knew anything.  

The Internet was just getting started.

 

So, we decided to join forces. 

 

All four companies agreed to help each other understand and move forward in the Internet space.

 

My role was to facilitate the flow of information.  

 

The whole thing exploded.  Within two weeks, I had dozens of companies who wanted to join forces with us in helping each other.  

 

Within two months, we had 100 huge companies involved.

 

admin-gray

 

So, I broke these companies into small groups of 10 or so and made sure competitors were in separate groups. 

 

We then started having meetings all over the country where everyone shared what [little] they knew.  Call it 'peer consulting' if you will.

 

Along the way, I learned the impressive value of 'peer consulting.'

 

Today, it's really just me.  I'm down in North Carolina semi-retired. Call me a "boutique". But I'm happy outside of the mainstream and would like to help you if I can.

 

Please contact me right now if you'd like some help.

 

billangelladj

 

On March 1, 1979, I opened the doors of Angell & Company as a marketing research and consulting company in New York City.

Before that, I worked as an Account Executive at a small advertising agency in Boston, then at one of the world's premier advertising research companies.
And, after that, just before opening Angell & Company, I worked at one of the world's best marketing research companies [namely Monroe Mendelsohn Research].

To say the least, when I opened in 1979, I really knew the marketing research business.

The idea was to provide research and consulting of the highest quality to the very largest companies in the world.

rocketship_6

Angell & Company took off like a rocket ship. We became known as a small firm that could handle very large accounts and very large, difficult projects.
I didn't want to be big.  Had no interest in being a research factory. Wanted quality over quantity.

I hired the best people I could find, paid them very well, and got out of their way.

The company was so successful that I moved out of New York in 1986 [to Connecticut] and really scaled down.  I worked part-time, became a single dad, and kept my hand in with a few clients.

 

The Internet Age

In 1998, I started getting questions about the Internet. I knew nothing about it and called a few clients and asked them to meet me in New York for a meeting on the subject.
At that meeting were senior exec's from Citibank, Marriott, The New York Times, and MetLife.

To make a long story short, there were really no resources in those days.  No one knew anything. The Internet was just getting started.

We all decided to join forces.  All four companies agreed to help each other understand and  move forward in the Internet space.

My role was to facilitate the flow of information.

The whole thing exploded.  Within two weeks, I had dozens of companies who wanted to join forces with us in helping each other.

Within two months, we had 100 huge companies involved.

admin-gray

So, I broke these companies into small groups of 10 or so and made sure competitors were in separate groups.

We then started having meetings all over the country where everyone shared what [little] they knew.  Call it 'peer consulting' if you will.

And I learned the impressive value of 'peer consulting.'

Today, it's really just me.  I'm down in North Carolina semi-retired.  Call me a "boutique". But I'm happy outside of the mainstream and would like to help you if I can.

Please contact me right now if you'd like some help.

billangelladj